(Please visit one of our advertisers)

No donations or subscriptions are required

   OR   
   
Subscription choices:
Board Karma = 40  (3488 positive of 3870 votes is 40 %pts higher than a neutral 50%)
All Things (Safety Oriented) Motorcycle   
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

You can the entire collection of Safety Tip articles in a 33 Megabyte PDF Portfolio

 All Forums
 Motorcycle Safety
 Polls
 How do you mount your ride?
Next Page
Member  Discussion Topic Next Topic
Page: of 2

Redbeard
Male Standard Member
107 Posts


South Ogden, UT
USA

Triumph

Sprint ST 955i
Peer Review: 1

Posted - 12/14/2010 :  11:11 AM   DetailDetail                        Like
Poll Question:
This thread made me curious: http://www.msgroup.org/forums/mtt/t...PIC_ID=12520

It was suggested that foot preference ("when standing at attention, then starting to walk, which foot is naturally brought forward first?") may have an influence on which way a rider prefers to mount their motorcycle.

How do you mount your ride?


Results:
I am right-footed and prefer to mount from the left   [61%] 53 votes 
I am right-footed and prefer to mount from the right   [10%] 9 votes 
I am left-footed and prefer to mount from the left   [15%] 13 votes 
I am left-footed and prefer to mount from the right   [5%] 4 votes 
Other (or, I'm only here to crack dirty jokes becaue of the thread title...)   [9%] 8 votes 
= Guests (35 votes)


Poll Status: Closed  »»   Total Votes: 87 counted  »»   Last Vote: 04/02/2011 1:40 PM 

scottrnelson
Advanced Member
6886 Posts
[Mentor]


Pleasanton, CA
USA

KTM

990 Adv, XR650L

Posted - 12/14/2010 :  12:52 PM
I'm not actually sure if I'm "right-footed" or "left-footed", but I get on the bike from the left side because that's the side that people have historically used to get on bicycles, motorcycles, and horses.

Somebody told me years ago that a horse would get spooked if you tried to get on from the right side. I don't know if there is any truth to that or not.

When getting on a bicycle, normally I put my left foot on the pedal, push off with my right foot to get some momentum, then swing my right leg over and continue riding off. I learned how to do it the other way many years ago as an experiment, and it felt awkward to get on from the other side.

For a motorcycle, it's just simpler to be on the side with the sidestand. If I ever have a reason to get on or off of the right side, it's no big deal.
Go to Top of Page

kacinpa
Male Advanced Member
802 Posts
[Mentor]


Lansdale, PA
USA

Triumph

Sprint GT

Posted - 12/14/2010 :  1:39 PM
quote:
Originally posted by scottrnelson


Somebody told me years ago that a horse would get spooked if you tried to get on from the right side. I don't know if there is any truth to that or not.



There is no truth to that...If a horse is trained to carry a rider they don't really care what side you get on.

I used to have several horses and was very into horseback riding. I am also a student of history and was involved with many reenactment groups from different time periods. The reason horses are mounted from the left goes back to the days of knights with swords. Most people then as now were right handed. If you are right handed you carry your sword in a scabbard on the left side of your body in order to be able to quickly draw it. Swinging your leg AND a sword across the back of a horse is quite difficult, if not impossible, depending on the length of the sword. Therefore when riding a horse with a sword ( and from the Roman Empire through the mid 19th century anyone who could afford to ride a horse also typically wore a sword all the time) you mounted from the left.

I can only assume that when the motorcycle (still sometimes reffered to as an "Iron Horse") came into use the practice of mounting from the left just carried over. As a result side stands were locate don the left side of the bike, furth facilitating this.

BTW, I guessed that I am "right footed" and except when I pull the bike into the garage (as opposed to backing it in) I always mount and dismount from the left.
Go to Top of Page

scottrnelson
Advanced Member
6886 Posts
[Mentor]


Pleasanton, CA
USA

KTM

990 Adv, XR650L

Posted - 12/14/2010 :  4:04 PM
quote:
Originally posted by kacinpa

The reason horses are mounted from the left goes back to the days of knights with swords.
I want a new choice.

[] - I don't know which foot I prefer, but mount on the left so that I don't catch my sword on the bike.
Go to Top of Page

Mystic Red
Male Senior Member
379 Posts


Twin Lakes, Idaho
USA

BMW

K1100LT

Posted - 12/14/2010 :  8:11 PM
I would think that if you are right handed then you are left footed. Try to shoot a layup jumping off your right foot and using your right hand.
At least if you play basketball your strong leg is opposite of your of your strong hand.
But then again, I kick with my right leg.
Go to Top of Page

HeavyMetal
Male Junior Member
94 Posts


Kimberly, Idaho
USA

Honda

Valkyrie

Posted - 12/14/2010 :  8:11 PM
I voted (other) but not for the dirty jokes

I am left-footed, but I don't mount my bike from any particular side. I use which-ever side is most convenient. At work I park fairly close to a chain link fence on the left side. In that case I mount from the right. Other places I may mount from the left. I don't feel awkward from either side.
Go to Top of Page

dmauray
Male Standard Member
100 Posts


Rockledge, Fl
USA

Harley-Davidson

FLHTK, FLSTFI

Posted - 12/15/2010 :  11:13 AM
I got on and off from the left for years until I hurt my back the one time. I couldn't lift my right leg to get on or off the bike. Once I was on the bike it was much less painful riding the bike than driving the car. Every time I went around a turn in the car the pain would shoot through my back. On the bike my back would stay aligned with no pain around turns. I started mounting from the right and I am used to that now. Before I get on or off I grab the front break which should prevent any problems with mounting.
Go to Top of Page

Moses
Male Senior Member
377 Posts
[Mentor]


Grand Rapids, Michigan
USA

Harley-Davidson

FX Softail

Posted - 12/15/2010 :  11:27 AM
It's considered proper to mount a scabbard on the side of your bike to hold your sword, for obvious safety reasons.

Then you can do it like in the westerns- run up from behind the bike, jump over from the back, hit the saddle, and yell giddyup!
(Watch out for those sissy bars, though - ouch!)
Go to Top of Page

SkootchNC
Male Advanced Member
1063 Posts
[Mentor]


raleigh, north carolina
USA

Harley-Davidson

road glide

Posted - 12/15/2010 :  1:52 PM
When the bikes (mine and my wife's) are parked the garage, they are close to the left wall (facing from the street). It's easier for ME, to lift my left leg over the seat, and settle in. The rest of the time, it would seem to be whether I approach the bike from the left, or right.
I dismount (in the garage) from the right side, and have never burnt my leg
I know the MSF preached mounting and dismounting from the left, grab the front brake, and swing your right leg over the seat... ditto for the dismount.
Go to Top of Page

Baggsy
Male Advanced Member
720 Posts
[Mentor]


Ottawa, Ontario
Canada

Suzuki

09 Wee

Posted - 12/15/2010 :  6:16 PM
I consider myself left handed and left footed ( try kicking a football ).
I mount from the left. I carry my swords in a special over the shoulder case intended for this purpose. I'm not sure if it's impolite or illegal to let your steel show in public.
Go to Top of Page

Daddio
Male Advanced Member
775 Posts
[Mentor]


Calera, AL
USA

Suzuki

Bandit 1250

Posted - 12/16/2010 :  6:58 AM
I also do not know what foot is my predominant. The USMC pretty much took that choice from me. Always step out on the left. If I were to kick a football I would use my right foot.

The one time I remember knocking my bike off its sidestand I was dismounting to the right. I had blocked off a normal left exit and bumped the bike getting off. The bike invites mounting and dismounting from the left. I accept that invitation.

Sorry - no joke about mounting

Go to Top of Page

radan2
Male Advanced Member
1117 Posts
[Mentor]


Jacksonville, NC
USA

Moto Guzzi

2007 Breva V750 ie

Posted - 12/16/2010 :  9:28 AM
If you have ever participated in any marching group for any length of time, you have been taught to push with the right foot and swing the left foot forward. The cadence is left-right-left-right. Any person who has been in the military for any length of time will fall into that pattern even if the left side is naturally dominant. Changing footedness apparently is not as difficult as changing handedness.
Go to Top of Page

cpietran
Male New Member
19 Posts


Martinsburg, WV-West Virginia
USA

(None)

Posted - 02/27/2011 :  10:16 PM
The very first time I ever approached a bike it just seemed natural to mount from the left. The left side of the seat is lower and angled more appropriately to facilitate smooth mounting IMO. Also, it makes it easier to have proper crotch/seat alignment without binding up pant/gear when sliding on.

One last thing: it is NEVER a good idea to mount from either side while wearing a kilt. Yes I know this from experience, yes it was dumb, no I will never do it again. I was SO worried I was going to get a ticket for public indecency on the ride home that day.

Carl
Go to Top of Page

Halap
Male Junior Member
60 Posts


Brooklyn, NY
USA

Suzuki

M50

Posted - 03/04/2011 :  9:27 AM
quote:
Originally posted by kacinpa

quote:
Originally posted by scottrnelson


Somebody told me years ago that a horse would get spooked if you tried to get on from the right side. I don't know if there is any truth to that or not.



There is no truth to that...If a horse is trained to carry a rider they don't really care what side you get on.

I used to have several horses and was very into horseback riding. I am also a student of history and was involved with many reenactment groups from different time periods. The reason horses are mounted from the left goes back to the days of knights with swords. Most people then as now were right handed. If you are right handed you carry your sword in a scabbard on the left side of your body in order to be able to quickly draw it. Swinging your leg AND a sword across the back of a horse is quite difficult, if not impossible, depending on the length of the sword. Therefore when riding a horse with a sword ( and from the Roman Empire through the mid 19th century anyone who could afford to ride a horse also typically wore a sword all the time) you mounted from the left.

I can only assume that when the motorcycle (still sometimes reffered to as an "Iron Horse") came into use the practice of mounting from the left just carried over. As a result side stands were locate don the left side of the bike, furth facilitating this.

BTW, I guessed that I am "right footed" and except when I pull the bike into the garage (as opposed to backing it in) I always mount and dismount from the left.


kacinpa,
You got it 90% right, with one caveat: Although a horse has absolutely no innate preference for being mounted from one side or the other, being a "prey" animal in evolutionary terms, it is wired to be spooked by unusual occurrences, and if it were trained to only be mounted from the left, and then were mounted from the right, it can indeed get spooked. Horses have been mounted from the left since at least 400BC (Xenophon, "The Art of Horsemanship") and until the 20th century. Lately, however, it has become mostly a non-issue, since most trainers will train their horses to accept a rider from either side; but in keeping with the safety message of this site, when at all in doubt, mount from the left and avoid an embarrassing and potentially fatal situation.

That's my story and you are welcome to it.
Go to Top of Page

Rickbrowngsts
Starting Member
5 Posts


Rocklin, ca
USA

BMW

K1200LT

Posted - 08/30/2016 :  4:58 PM
I took a training class once where the instructor had taken a motor officer training class. They are trained to mount from the right. That makes perfect sense. A lot of their mounting and dismounting is after a traffic stop, and putting a little bit more space between them and traffic has to be a safety advantage. Not being a motor officer, having a 34 inch seat, and being 63 years old with knees and hips that are not as flexible as they once were, I always mount from the left, the low side.
Go to Top of Page

commonground
Male Standard Member
155 Posts


Windsor, PA
USA

Yamaha

V Star 1300

Posted - 08/31/2016 :  5:31 AM
I mount from the left also. I've ridden many horses and understand the reason for the left side mount. I have also learned with motorcycles that pointing the front wheel to the right when mounting or dismounting makes it easier for a short old guy (72) to get on and off. With the bars to the right, I grab both grips, which are better situated for grabbing, and swing my right leg high enough to miss the pillion seat. When I am astraddle the bike it is also easier to upright the bike to vertical since it isn't leaned over quite so far. I'm short (5'6") and have a fairly heavy bike (712 lbs) so I learned how to make the best of things. That's what getting old is all about.
Go to Top of Page

Horse
Senior Member
263 Posts


Newbury, Berkshire
United Kingdom

BMW

R850RT

Posted - 08/31/2016 :  10:45 AM
quote:
Originally posted by commonground

I mount from the left also. I'm short (5'6") and have a fairly heavy bike (712 lbs) so I learned how to make the best of things.


Hah!

All well and good until you strap a large package to the pillion seat . . .

I found that the elegant method is to stand well back, lift the right leg up . . . and hop to the bike :)

[Or stand (gently) on the left footrest and lift the right leg over, then sit down to lift the bike vertical]




Go to Top of Page

commonground
Male Standard Member
155 Posts


Windsor, PA
USA

Yamaha

V Star 1300

Posted - 08/31/2016 :  11:39 AM
I've seen some pretty big people stand on the foot rest and swing over. One guy would have his wife, or whomever she was, get on (200 lbs.), put her feet up and then he (250 lbs) would stand on the peg and get on. I didn't do the math on how much pressure was exerted on the side stand but, it was a bunch. I doubt that they were designed for the weight.
Go to Top of Page

Alan_Hepburn
Male Standard Member
191 Posts


San Jose, Ca
USA

Honda

1994 GL1500SE

Posted - 08/31/2016 :  11:45 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Horse
...[Or stand (gently) on the left footrest and lift the right leg over, then sit down to lift the bike vertical]



That's mostly what I do - step up onto the left footpeg, lift the right leg over the seat to find the right footpeg, and sit down. Mounting from the right is problematic with a sidecar!
Go to Top of Page

commonground
Male Standard Member
155 Posts


Windsor, PA
USA

Yamaha

V Star 1300

Posted - 08/31/2016 :  11:45 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Horse

quote:
Originally posted by commonground

I mount from the left also. I'm short (5'6") and have a fairly heavy bike (712 lbs) so I learned how to make the best of things.


Hah!

All well and good until you strap a large package to the pillion seat . . .

I found that the elegant method is to stand well back, lift the right leg up . . . and hop to the bike :)

[Or stand (gently) on the left footrest and lift the right leg over, then sit down to lift the bike vertical]



I've never had big package on the pillion seat (big saddle Bags) or a person either, for that matter.

Elegant is in the eyes of the beholder.

Go to Top of Page

James R. Davis
Male Administrator
17282 Posts
[Mentor]


Houston, TX
USA

Honda

GoldWing 1500

Posted - 08/31/2016 :  12:04 PM Follow poster on Twitter  Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
We do what we have to do.

I have always had a backrest. That stops trying to get right leg over the back.

I simply lifted right leg up above seat, then slid it across the seat, then sat down. Left leg never moved from its position on the ground when I started.
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 2  Discussion Topic Next Topic  
Next Page
Jump To:
All Things (Safety Oriented) Motorcycle © Master Strategy Group Go To Top Of Page
  This page was generated in 0.48 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05